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ANGELUS SILESIUS

Flitch (AS) – Homem e Mundo

Selections from the Cherubinic Wanderer

quarta-feira 21 de setembro de 2022, por Cardoso de Castro

      

Angelus Silesius  . Selections from the Cherubinic Wanderer. Translated with an Introduction by J. E. Crawford Flitch

      

311 (I. 140)
MAN IS ALL THINGS

Man is the Sum of Things. If he lack but a jot,
The full scope of his wealth surely he knoweth not.

312 (IV. 146)
THE HIGHEST NOBILITY OF MAN

This is my true nobility,
That I have power to be, while still
On earth, a King, an Emperor,
A God  , or anything I will.

313 (III. 111)
THE HUMAN HEART

God, Devil and the World would all
Invade my heart—such rivalry
Doth prove it to be wondrous fair
And of a high nobility.

314 (V. 181)
THE GREEDIEST

  How greedy is a Heart!
A thousand Worlds were all too few—
’Twould crave to have them all at once
  Ay, and more too.

315 (V. 170)
ALL WORKS ARE ALIKE TO GOD

Man’s works are level before God.
To Him the Saint is full as dear
When he lifts up his cup to drink
As when he lifts his voice in prayer.

316 (V. 334)
GOD VALUETH THE WORK ACCORDING TO THE WORKER

Know this for sure—the good man’s sleep
Is more of worth in God’s own sight
Than all the cry the sinner makes,
Chanting and praying through the night.

317 (V. 174)
WHAT THE SAINT DOTH, GOD DOTH IN HIM

’Tis God Himself who in the Saint
Enacts the Saint’s activities,
God walks, stands, sleeps, wakes, eats and drinks,
And the Saint’s courage too is His.

318 (VI. 154)
GOD DOETH ALL HIMSELF

Himself God lays the cord to the shaft,
Himself draws back the bow—that’s why,
When He Himself releases it,
The arrow cleaves the target’s eye.

319 (I. 194)
WHAT ART THOU IN RESPECT OF GOD?

Think not thou standest high with God
Because thy works His favour claim:
Even the labours of the Saints
To Him are trifling as a game.

320 (I. 119)
THOU MUST GO TO THE SOURCE

Water   is pure and clean when at the well  -head quaffed:
Drink’st thou not at the Spring, there’s danger in the draught.

321 (IV. 190)
THE CROSS MANIFESTETH WHAT IS HIDDEN

Thou canst not know thyself in ease and cheer of heart;
The Cross first showeth thee the man thou inly art.

322 (V. 275)
SUFFERING IS MORE PROFITABLE THAN JOY

Man, hadst thou only known the good
And profit Suffering can bestow,
Surely thou wouldst have chosen it
Rather than Pleasure, long ago.

323 (IV. 79)
THE BEST FRIEND AND ENEMY

My Body is my dearest Friend,
Likewise my bitterest Enemy;
It bears me up and binds me down,
As it doth list, contrarily.
I hate it, yet I love it too,
And when death comes to part us twain,
How joyful will that parting be!
And how that parting will be pain!

324 (V. 135)
READINESS MODIFIES THE BLOW

Is not the Wise Man sad at heart
When Sorrow knocketh at his door  ?—
He’s made all ready long ago
To welcome such a Visitor.

325 (III. 88)
THERE MUST BE CRUCIFIXION

Who in the world-to-come would go rose-gathering
Must first know well how sharply this world’s briars sting.

326 (III. 89)
BEAUTY

Beauty I dearly love, and yet
I think that Beauty scarce adorns
Aught that I see, unless I find
It always set about with thorns.

327 (V. 114)
IT IS FOLLY TO STRIVE FOR HONOUR

What fools are we who keenly strive
 Honour to win and keep.
God giveth Honour but to him
 Who holdeth Honour cheap.

328 (V. 141)
THE ACTION OF THE WORLD IS A TRAGEDY

Friend, envy not the World—it goes   it own sweet way,
Yet is its Action nothing but a Tragic Play.

329 (V. 263)
HELL MUST BE TASTED

None can escape the throat of Hell.
The path thereto once must thou tread,
And if alive thou go not in,
Then surely shalt thou go in dead.

330 (III. 146)
THE MIGHT OF SOULS

The Soul   is very strong—God’s self
Acknowledgeth ’tis even so.
He cannot break from her embrace
Unless she please to let Him go.

331 (VI. 82)
THY WILL MAKETH THEE LOST

By thy own Will thou’rt lost, by thy own Will thou’rt found  ,
Thou by thy Will art freed, and by thy Will art bound.

332 (V. 98)
GOD CANNOT CONTROL THE WILL

Naught is there mightier than God;
Yet hath He not the might to turn
My Will from willing what it will,
My yearning as it needs must yearn?

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