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Evangelho de Tomé - Logion 7

quarta-feira 20 de julho de 2022

    

Pla

Jesus   disse: feliz é o leão que ao homem   devora, pois o leão se converterá em homem e ímpio fica o homem que o leão devora e deixa que se converta em homem.


JESUS HA DICHO: FELIZ ES EL LEON QUE AL HOMBRE DEVORA, PUES EL LEON SE CONVERTIRA EN HOMBRE Y MANCHADO QUEDA EL HOMBRE AL QUE EL LEON DEVORA Y DEJA QUE SE CONVIERTA EN HOMBRE.

Puech

Jésus a dit : Heureux est le lion que l’homme mangera, et le lion deviendra homme; et maudit est l’homme que le lion mangera, et le lion deviendra homme [1].

Suarez

Jésus a dit : heureux est le lion que l’homme mangera, et le lion deviendra homme, et souillé est l’homme que le lion mangera, et le lion deviendra homme.

Meyer

Jesus said, “Blessed is the lion that the human will eat, so that the lion becomes human. (2) And cursed [2] is the human that the lion will eat, and the lion will become human.” [3]

Barnstone

Jesus said, "Blessed is the lion which becomes man when consumed by man; and cursed is the man whom the lion consumes, and the lion becomes man."

Ehrman

Blessed is the lion that the human will eat so that the lion becomes human. And cursed is the human whom the lion will eat, and the lion will become human.

Layton

JESUS said, “Blessed is the lion that the human being will devour so that the lion becomes human. «And cursed is the human being that the lion devours; and the lion will become human.”


Miroshnikov  

As Dieter Lührmann has shown, Didymus the Blind was familiar with a saying similar to the one we have in Gos. Thom. 7. Below is the relevant section from his commentary on Ps 43/44:12. The Greek words in bold face indicate the vocabulary of the lion saying disseminated throughout the passage. The italicized clauses demonstrate that Didymus’ version of the saying employs a chiastic structure:

Therefore, if the man that preserves what is according to God  ’s image and [likeness, having become a teacher like Jesus], eats a wild man by means of education [and consumes him insofar as he is a lion, this one who was eaten] by the teacher and became his food will not be a lion. Therefore, he is blessed and he is being blessed not because he is a lion, but because he became a man. But if a reasonable man who was led by reason was eaten by some savage-hearted wild man or by an evil force, he becomes a lion and such a man is wretched. For “Woe to the man whom a lion will eat.”

Even though Didymus quotes only one verse of the saying and paraphrases the rest, we can still easily see that it has almost the same structure as Gos. Thom. 7. The following table contrasts Didymus’ version of the saying with Didymus’ interpretation of it:

The lion saying according Didymus Didymus’ exegesis   of the lion saying
 
Blessed is the lion
Whom a man will eat
And the lion will become a man.
And wretched is the man
Whom a lion will eat
And the man will become a lion.
 
Blessed is the wild man
Whose teacher is a reasonable man
For he is no longer wild.
And wretched is the reasonable man
Whose teacher is a wild man
For he is no longer reasonable.

The only major difference between the two versions of the saying (viz., that in the nhc 11 and that in Didymus) is that, according to Didymus, the man who is eaten by the lion becomes a lion.12 How, then, did this discrepancy come about?


Ver online : Evangelho de Tomé


[1sic : lire sans doute « l’homme deviendra lion ».

[2Or “foul.”

[3Here the lion seems to symbolize what is passionate and bestial in human experience. A person may consume the lion or be consumed by it. Cf. Plato Republic 588e–589b.